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yes, countries -- if we look at the most recent presidential election in the united states, there was something if he went through the republican primaries people were saying let's not this person. it's not tim pawlenty dropshot right after the audio what caucuses and then michele bachman dropshot and new gingrich can you are left with a sort of one person left standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's about picking losers. this is not the person, this is not the person. and finally you get the last person standing. the process of elimination. >> host: which is consistent in better organization it tends to be. >> it is a simplified version of reality that i think you used to build the theories that are simple and then you make them more complex but if you take say gee so they're famous for the way they choose leaders. we always tell our students g is a company that works in practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things that we say it should do but it is successful. and if you have the competency, it seems to be that it's good at picking leaders c
presidential election in the united states, there was something if he went through their public and primaries that people were saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops out and then michele bachmann drops out and then newt gingrich drops out and eventually you are left with the last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's about picking losers. this is not the 1 -- person and finally gets the last person standing. >> host: a process of elimination, which is consistent in whatever organization it is. >> guest: i think it is in the sense that it's a simplified version of reality, that i think you used to build very. theory star simple and you make a more complex but if you take ge. ge is famous for the way it chooses leaders. we always tell her students, ge is the company that works in practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do anything as we say it should do but it is profitable and successful. if you had to pick ge's core competency it seems to be it's good at picking leaders and developing managers in training managers and picking the right people. ge spends 20 y
's filtration processes. the most recent presidential election in the united states. there was something, if you went through the republican primaries, that people were saying, well, it's not this person. it's not -- tim drops out after the iowa caucuses and michele bachmann, and newt gingrich, and you're left with a last person standing. most often, it's not about picking a winner, but it's about picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person, and finally, you get a last person standing. >> host: process of elimination. >> guest: exactly. >> host: which is consistent in whatever organization it is? >> guest: so -- >> host: has to be? >> guest: i think it is in the sense that it's a platonic idea, a simp fied # version of reality that i think you use to build theory. start with simple and make them more complex, but if you take, say, ge. so ge is famous for the way it chooses leaders. ge, we always tell students ge is a company that works in practice, but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do anything of the things we say it should do, but it's incredibly profit l and successful.
compromise. in november 1860 after his election, the country was gripped because many southerners felt in the republican party, the republican party was in northern party and proudly so. they did not have a significant southern connection. lincoln was elected without a single electoral vote without any of the southern states. the first time in the nations history, a party without any notable southern components would be taking over the executive branch of the national government. but there was more. the republican party was probably a northern party. during its existence in the mid-1850s, the rhetoric had assaulted the south and racial slavery, their determination -- the republicans determination, were to win a national election without any southern support and republicans repeatedly condemned this undemocratically, even on american way. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, seven radicals, those people who preached the gospel of the union, they took to the public platform and newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had act immedi
this. um, so, if i have to, i have to. let's talk about the big election. last night, due to the technicality called the constitution, barack obama was re-elected president. though-- ( cheers ) ( applause ) uh. ( bleep ) you. ( laughter ) ( applause ) now, folks, keep in mind, keep in mind, this was no landslide, folks. it was like a 51-49er, okay. just because obama won the blue states up here, he's the president of all of them now? romney won all that red stuff. why don't we elect our president on square footage, because romney won some big states, folks, whole damn south. louisiana, n'awlins loves mi-rawmnah. but, but, evidently, here's the deal. of the nine key swing states, balm won eight. i don't-- i mean how-- even pennsylvania. despite the fact that after a week of hurricane sandy, thousands of amish remain without power. ( applause ) anyway, anyway, obama won. america is done. it's over! jimmy, roll the credits. ♪ ♪ ( "america the beautiful beauti) ( cheers and applause ) i'll tell you, folks, there's a simple reason why america is over. because last night's
. presidential elections of 2012 is finally over. after two years of relentless poll analysis, electoral map swiping, undecided voter dial testing and being forced to use the word "cuyahoga" in a sentence -- (laughter) -- we can finally take a breather. just relax with a nice soothing cup of camomile breeze and just let it all -- >> do you think it's too early to talk about 2016? we don't think so. (gunshot) (cheers and applause) >> stephen: (bleep) you! i've had it! i'm a human being goddamnit! i have rights! can't we just move on to some other aspect of our lives? not everything is a constant contest for political advantage! america's facing some serious problems! there are times to run and then there are times to govern! we need to come together, let it go, move on, god! (applause) (laughter) so what are the numbers? >> the public policy polling survey asked iowa democrats and republicans last week whond they would like to see as their nominee. for the democrat, hillary clinton the overwhelmingly top pick. 58%. followed by joe biden. for the republicans, their top favorites mike huckabee,
it very, very neat and controversial election that was decided that the house of representatives. he wanted to speak to this idea that we were all americans again and certainly that's the way i wish we would feel after the storm and aftermath of that. so we can learn from these moments americans are very good at coming together. doesn't feel that way right now in the midst of this election, but we also have this extraordinary moment, where we have a crisis and moment of division butting heads against each other. i am hopeful we can learn from our history and see that americans to respond to a crisis like this. >> host: as kenneth davis alluded to, the reason he's in new york and both tedious and washington is because of sandy. we had studio issuescome the sore little patch together for this "in depth" with kenneth davis. your most recent "don't know much about the american presidents" is about the american president and you talk about a couple elections. i went to took about 1800 the election of james k. polk versus henry clay. you compare those talking about how vicious they were. i
a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. on the other hand, there are some real pluses possible here. if egypt takes some real responsibility for making the cease-fire work, we'll stop those missiles from going through the tunnels in gaza, and they seem to be moving in that direction. that can make a real difference in terms of what's going on in gaza and their attacks on israel, which have been the cause of the whole thing. >> what would you like to see the president say, to put a brake on morsi seizing power? what words does the president have to use to say we're not going back to mubarak? >> he has to express those concerns and say, obviously, we want this change to not just be democratic but also supportive of stability and also protecting minorities and human rights in egypt. he says that, but at the same time he has to point out that behind all of this is iran. iran's support of hamas, hezbollah, syria, and the way that has been filtered into weaponry that goes through egypt, into gaza, if that can be stopped, by egypt, and if iran can
is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. he goes to georgetown. from georgetown to becomes the arkansas candidate and then goes to oxford. he's an incredible success everywhere, but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he's attracted to the kind of women as mother directs in two, the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that's really where his eyes at 10 until he comes back to be a law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> imacs, author and lecturer, kenneth davis, cleaned author of the don't know much about serious talks about history, geography and more. the selling off there has written 12 adult nonfiction books including the hidden history, and nation rising and is 2012 release, "don't know >> host: author kennetn presidents." >> host: author kenneth davis, where did they don't know much series of books come fro
start with this war in washington. say what you will about the election we just had. this one's hotter, nastier, more personal. one side says it's about character, about whether a close confederate of the president told the truth, the whole truth as she knew it when she went on national television and said the death of a u.s. ambassador was a spontaneous reaction to an anti-muslim video, some trouble-making clown made out in california. ignoring john mccain and his ail argue evidence it was an organized act of terrorism. not so says the president. his u.n. ambassador and close friend simply told the truth as she was permitted to tell it, what the cia gave her to say and no more. for that he charges susan rice, in the words of the new york post, being fried. political fight fans on the tabloids relish this extreme combat what should be a good person's judgment? that's my question tonight. is susan rice now a surrogate for the president, someone to take the punishment when others above her pay grade should be answering the questions, or is she accountable for going on national television
weeks ago when john boehner after the election essentially said, there's nothing we can do about obama care. it's going into effect next year. people are going to have to start enrolling, those exchanges are going to have to get up and running. he saw a revolt among his house republicans and republicans across the united states, just for saying it. now john boehner is doing a little backtracking. he wrote in the cincinnati enquirer, his hometown newspaper, the president's health care law adds a massive, expensive, unworkable government program at a time when our national debt already exceeds the size of our country's entire economy. we can't afford it and we can't afford to leave it intact. so try as they might, remember the last congress republicans passed a lot of bills out of the house of representatives that tore apart obama care. as even the president calls it now. they didn't go anywhere in the senate and meanwhile, alex, after the thanksgiving break, the principles are expected to get back together to begin negotiating in earnest. as you're right the clock is ticking. just a lit
a low profile. sheraton did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed to elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. to the governor's of louisiana and texas. there indian warrior slaughtering settlers in western kansas and eastern colorado. it was here he began prosecuting with brutal effect for the decorate that -- strategy he implemented in the shenandoah valley, one of total war. as waged in the shenandoah valley. it was a milder form of the cruder -- they were in agreement that in inflicting suffering on southern civilians would more quickly end the bloodshed. in urging sheraton to conduct the war in the shenandoah, if the war is to last another year, we the valley to remain barren waste. he a barn full of wheat i would rather sooner lose the barn and wheat than my son. unlike the broader sill burning as it was called horrified and bittered valley residences. one described how the innovators came up the valley sweeping everything before them like a hurricane. there's nothing left from the horse down to the chick. en. raid the new settlement on the plain
. after that, more about the election with president obama's campaign master. later -- the evolution of facebook. >> the average new facebook user is in india or indonesia or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access facebook because they have not had access to a broad band connection. in a lot of cases there is not an infrastructure media of communications you have in the u.s. and lot of americans will leave me and say facebook is great for gossiping and to see what my friends are in for lunch, but if you were to talk to somebody in the middle east, maybe, you would hear a different story -- facebook was providing access to news, people that had unique access to information that they were not able to get out otherwise. you get a much more meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> facebook engineer chris cox with an insider's view of the company -- thanksgiving day on c-span. at 2:00 -- 2:00, chief justice john roberts. later, space pioneers and nash at -- nasa officials pay amash to the first man to walk on the moon, neil armstrong. >> federer reserv
the election results and actually stay in some sense where he can get a deal. mark twain said that tom sawyer pointed out, a preacher came to town who was so good that huck finn stayed saved until tuesday. chris: hold his party together. >> and get enough republican votes. >> the unpredictable things he hasn't planned for. chris: the black swan. >> i totally agree with annette. if you had told me in 2008 that the whoufs would have been consumed with worry in the first term over whether greek pensioners would accept austerity measures in europe, i wouldn't have thought that. it's these promises that determine the course. chris: hubris? >> he said it in his press conference, overreach. every president since roosevelt has had this horrible second term. for someone who wants to be a transforming president, that may be a problem. chris: keep the supreme court at nine. when we come back, the big question of the week -- americans look for new frontiers, always have. americans look for new frontiers, always have. will future secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can
plywood, pressboard made out of trees. this election made me sad. i thought we would go in the other direction and start putting people to work. why do we have millions and millions of illegal immigrants here doing jobs? if you go to a burger king, it is all mexicans. host: not feeling too optimistic about america's future right now. here is a headline from the "chicago sun-times." here is the "chicago tribune" this morning. and this is part of jesse resigning.'s letter from office. that is just a little bit of his letter and thenin "t. in "the hill" this morning -- and from "the huffington post, " this response from the white house -- that is from "the huffington coast" this morning. we are asking you about optimism for the next four years. claire in new jersey on their democrats' line. hi, claire. caller: how are you? host: what is your optimism level about america? caller: right now i am looking at 69%. host: where did you come up with 69% caller: i am from neward, new jersey. we depended on my husband working. i am working with the preschool. my son now is a police officer in atl
obama has to realize the moment. for a re-elected president there is so much good will out there, even among his opponents. now, we had an election which i think was decided but not decisive. there were, what, 57 million people who voted for romney. and there is a way that obama can kind of step forward and say, "these are the ideas. this is the method we're going to do this." he can-- i mean, you know, you talk to this man-- i mean, you don't get to talk to the people you write about. i get to talk to obama and say, "why did you do this? what happened here?" and he has good answers. he equips himself very well, and he needs to say, this is the theory of the case. this is how we're going to work this out. and the capacity and the good will with there. >> he said-- he's-- his best speech ever, i thought, was when he gave his race speech in 2008. he did that without the help of a lot of political consultants. my memory of this is they were mostly against him giving the speech. they said, "oh, my gosh. you can't mention race." he did this on his own. he needs to get away from the consulta
reality and this is the result of an election. it is significant. it's not only sacks b.chambliss. it's lindsey graham and he is most likely going to attract a primary challenger. this is not without risk but it's significant. it's not only the senators. you have senator coburn and saying it won't be terrible to raise taxes on the rich. i think we are starting to see a shift. the key is, is it just reductions or will some be willing to raise tax rates on the wealthy? that is going to be the real sticking point and ed, you heard what congressman king said. he said, look, it all has to be on the table. then you have speaker boehner saying that he wants obama care on the table in the fiscal cliff negotiations in reality will that be on the table, obama care in. >> you know, this is a a genius move by republicans. they wanted to repeal obama care. they would have done it had mitt romney been elected and they can't do that. boehner has said repealing it entirely is a moot issue. but getting some concessions is probably the way to do it. in part because there are democrats who agree that ch
missions. he's married to gabriel giffords. >> 5 good 54 day before the next election and already the first candidate for state wide office from the bay area. that story is next. >>> plus. the cabinet should have that he will could soon play out at the white house. potential bay area replacement. >> and tainted peanut butter. fda uses the power to shut down entire processing plant. >> plus protest over low milk >> plus protest over low milk crisis turns >> there are only 36 days until the nation could go over a fiscal cliff with a tax hike for everyone on new year's day and spending cuts on federal programs. today some republicans are defying party politics and break ago pledge they made in the name of a sluchlingts jonathan karl explains article of republican faith for decade. no tax increases of any kind, period. behind it all. this man. november quist. considered one of the most powerful men in washington. sentences he worked for ronald reagan in the 1980's he's gotten virtually every elected republican to sign a pledge promising no tax increases. >> taxpayer friendly co
to progressives, and having the president reelects and not electing governor romney is enough to make most people feel thankful, but one thanksgiving as we know it as nothing to do with the original thanksgiving right down to the paintings that we see. when we look at any painting of thanksgiving that we see when we were kids and we see the pilgrims and indians dancing around, we were starving, and the indians saved our lives, and we relaid them as only white people can, and the wompanoa were planes indians, and our whole image of thanksgiving is skewed. and it has been used to convince children that we got along fine with indians, and draw pictures of turkeys with our hands. president lincoln made it a holiday at the urging of the woman who wrote mary had a little lamb. it started with the spaniards who were the first ones to have thanksgiving, who massacred a bunch of indians, and a year later they were celebrating the safe return of the white people who weren't killed and it has evolved into this. it is one of those holidays that straddles the line of secular an
. and i think the fact that it comes after the election and after occupy and occupy sandy, i think, was a big deal too. there was a little bit of a shift of how people are seeing labor and how people are seeing some of these whole sort of set of progressive ideas that some people said to quote lennon here, we're in the dust pan of history. maybe take them out of the garbage can and dust them off a bit, but far too early to proclaim victory. greg was clearly a highly educated, highly motivated guy. so many of the people who work there are really, i think, you know, much more on the edge, not people who know labor law very well. are not people who can afford in their personal lives to take that kind of a risk even if they believe it. so i think it's really, really hard. >> but even as -- you know, i didn't think of it until now, but the idea just as a media story, to have something that pictures americans as people other than these cows just storming in -- the thing i hate about the black friday is the way the media uses it as proof, well, this is the american consumer. and walmart a
this many times, presidential elections are referendums on the incumbent party and in that vein such as the case as i believe it is, then you have to say that it's a judge to by the electorate was not a tremendous perhaps lackluster but not so as to make him ineligible for rehiring. second, when the country is in a serious political deadlock of the kind that we are in now and it's happened in our history but it doesn't happen often it generally means that the deadlock is focused on a definition question of america, and the definition question faced in this country is that we are going to go towards a european style of social democracy or more towards the traditional conservative populism of jackson or ronald reagan. third, when the country manages to deal with such a deadlock or change such a deadlock as this it doesn't come to any other means. so you have a lot of red and that may be a good harbinger for your party but it doesn't say anything about how the country is going to move forward in terms of what you promote. so given all of that if you buy any of it, to what extent do
and how he got elected, class warfare. >> not class warfare. >> and what percent-- >> no idea. >> where did that come from, occupy wall street. where did you get the 99, 1%, that's occupy wall street. >> he only wants to raise taxes on 1%. >> no, he wants to do more. >> thanks for that introduction of this on thanksgiving day. >> dana. >> what i'm thankful for the election is over and that it was decisive and that he won and now the republican party is going to have to regroup. i think that was good for everybody, get it done, over with and move on. >> and work-- >> if you will. and so anyway, i think it's good. i think that people, thanksgiving will be good too time to reach that button. >> andrea, he had lost the media would be devastated and we'd have to deal with that. >> i would be thankful for that. i'm not thankful he got reelected. i'm sorry, i didn't say it's a good thing for the republican party. i don't, it's not a good thing for the country. i'm not thankful. i don't care if gives us four more years to regroup. i think the damage he's going to do in four years is did hebt tr
elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. city alderman, governors of louisiana and texas. consequently, president johnson removed sheridan as military governor. he was transferred to the west to command the district encompassing the southern great plains. they are, indian warrior bands were slaughtering settlers in western kansas and eastern colorado. and it was here that sheridan begin prosecuting with brutal effectiveness, a strategy that implemented in the shenandoah valley, one of cold war. as wage in the shenandoah valley was a milder form that did not distinguish between soldiers and civilians. by 1864, lincoln, grant, sheridan and sherman were in agreement that inflicting suffering on seven civilians would more quickly and the bloodshed. and urging shared into conduct the cold war and the shinto, grant wrote him if the war is to last another year, we want the shenandoah valley to remain a barren waste. sheridan believed it was more merciful to destroy property and to kill southern men. he wrote, if i had a barn full of weeds and enhance them,
. they are blaming obamacare on this, but this was before the election the price of health care was going up. across the board, we are not dealing with problems at hand. both sides of the aisle, those that don't want to give an answer to this before we go over the fiscal cliff, they're not responding to the will of the people. they will be voted out. there's no doubt. if we have some very lovely and caring republicans that are very conservative and we love them, but we will vote them out if they don't fix this. we are holding them responsible as we are holding the democrats. host: thanks for the call. we will continue discussing the fiscal cliff and taking your calls. we want to point out some other news going on in the world. here's the front page of the boston globe this morning -- clinton was dispatched by president obama to israel and is meeting today with egyptian officials and palestinian officials as well. the headline from the tribune -- late tuesday night clinton met with benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem and plans to go to the west bank on wednesday. clinton is preparing to step down early n
chris christie, just announce thad he's running for re-election. christie's won praise and new found popularity with his handling of hurricane sandy. he says he is going to seek another term next year. so he can continue leading the state through the long recovery. and he, won back in 2009 by 86,000 votes. so far no democratic challenger has put their name in the hat, but we're hearing rumbles of potentially newark mayor cory booker. >>> another popular politician who has kind of gained some voice on the national stage. should be interesting. i wonder how two things will impact him in terms of his standing within the gop. number one, of course, the famous scene of christie and the president during hurricane sandy when he was very praiseworthy, you know, of the president, the speech at the convention, republican convention where he kind of talked, according to critics, talked a lot more about himself than governor romney. the stat was 17 minutes into the speech before he said the name romney. remember that? you wonder how the gop now feels about him. he is a popular guy. so -- >> got
been elected because romney had vowed to throw the whole thing out. >> it made it a moot point. >> exactly. >> bill: right. so they say this is inevitable. here it comes. so we'll have the lower court decide. >> it's very interesting because it's two issues that were encumbered. two new ripe issues, they'll hear this in the spring of 2013, which means it could go back up to the supreme court and still could get struck down, imagine that. >> bill: just this part of it. >> based on these grounds. >> bill: all right. many people know that guilfoyle was once first lady of san francisco. >> and clothed, thank you. >> bill: we expected that. so you were i guess the most powerful woman in town. so you're there and you understand the rhythms of the city. beautiful city, by the way. now the city has gone totally crazy, right? >> yes. >> bill: how long were you first lady? how long ago was that? >> now, what was it? six years ago. >> bill: six years ago. in the six-year period, they want to bangled fish, they want to do this and that. >> it's very disturbing because what they had was peo
. it is not something they can get much political profit out of it if you are an elected public official. if you go back to your constituency and say i have sponsored legislation that has improved the evaluation system for federal servants, how many people would be energized by that? i was on a task force on this topic, in a sense, the future of the public service, with senators and congressmen at the federal level. one congressman that i spoke to who was known as one of the ones that were concerned with civil servants, with a proper and effective management of governmental activities. he had been a local level official and was very interested in trying to make his local government very well managed. he sponsored legislation at the federal level to try to improve management in federal operations, support good management. at one point, i asked him, how many congressmen and senators are there that share your commitment to this, are willing to invest to improve management in the federal service? he said, about 10 people that really wanted to help and invest in this. why? people do not get much support for
in egypt. but those >> wendy: the election of momomohammed morsi as president gave egyptians hope. and now many are frustrated and impatient. >> the situation, of course, is getting worse. there is a lot of insecurities, and in stability that is happening in egypt. >> reporter: 25% of all egyptians live at our below the poverty level. earning less than $2 a day. many of them are widows. an estimated 1.7 million egyptian children are orphans. marin miad is the founder of coptic orphans, a group that reaches out to egyptian widows and their children. >> once a father passes away, you have nothing. the first step, of course, the children are pulled out of school. you can't afford to send them to school. they become then the child labor. they become the child brides. they become those that are abused and they grow to perpetuate this poverty. >> reporter: the widows and the orphans are treated like social outcast. and the egyptians have no unemployment or social security. her husband, george, died from stomach cancer four years ago. she and her two children have struggled ever since. they live
were having during the election. they lost. a majority of the american people, more than the number of people who actually voted for the president don't great with that approach. they great with the president's himself here in not recognizing that he does not have the leverage he believes he had. >> he grew his from boehner earthquake. >> no, he didn't. fuel will youly lost sea. >>> now, litz listen to, this fiscal cliff or no fiscal cliff, your taxes will probably go up anyway. it's all because of obama. >> the economy, slam investors and triple capitalism. say no to nationalized health care system, no to blanket tax increases and that means let low. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and
to determine what product will be successful rather than a vote. >> what about the elected representatives? this is like the world's largest agglomeration. some have elected bodies of people. something the gives the user is a vote. >> it is an interesting idea. >> that means no. [laughter] if you go back now and look at what mark zuckerberg was saying, he was open with the idea that the wanted everyone in the world to be an facebook. what is the thing that now you are completely open about the ambition but it happens in three years or two years or five years, we're going to be like, what got word that -- where did that come from? >> mark talks about categories transformer to be influenced by social media. you are seeing that with news and more with -- the way that people this cover and -- news coming from social media. >> how many people here get their news from social media? i do. you kind of get your news from social media. >> if you think about what is happening in categories, there is commerce and travel and shopping. these are right now one player games. if you think about your going
think our people that we elect our better than that. there are always going to be some people who let you down, but we all -- now to tell you how important we are, my daughter lucinda told me about a conversation that -- she met a mother of wonderful children and the person said, well, tell me, what are you doing here? louis -- lucinda said, well, my mother is speaking. she and season for are going to be speaking tomorrow. oh, oh? well, they're going to be speaking about life in at the white house. hmm-mmm. listen then proceeded to say, oh, my grandfather was president lyndon johnson. and the person said, well, what did he do? [laughter] now, what does it teaches you is that susan and i are not as famous as we think we are. [laughter] >> susan, your father's legacy, people forget about how close he was to being elected in his own right and vindicated on and so many friends. but what are the specifics that you think history has not yet given him enough credit for, ways in which his influence is echoed? in might be things like helsinki. in my be legislation. it might be examples. >> tal
himself to be elected. one thing, he didn't give any speeches. he wrote his acceptance of the nomination and the one line in that message that caught the attention of the country was let us have peace. this was something that you electrified the south as well as the no.. in the period -- and battlefields of a different kind. congress was warring against the executive. who would govern? another question was who would govern in the south? would republican regime imposed upon the south by union troops, would they governed, will would the pre-war majority govern in the south? grant became something of a sympathetic figure. he was a good union general. he was the one who granted generous surrender terms to we's troops in appomattox believing upon the war's end they had to get back to the south which was starring as a result of the war and in no small part because of grant's strategy in places like georgia the south was starving. 11 take their horses to go back and plow their fields and treating them once again as fellow americans rather than rebels. when his troops began to cheer about the su
and that is what we did. there is an election coming up in israel. netanyahu looked like he would achieve reelection there anyway. but internally israel, and abroad in his relationship with the white house what has prime minister benjamin netanyahu achieved? >> well, relations are a little bit warmer, at least for now, i think, between the white house and the israeli prime minister. president obama and netanyahu have not gotten along. that's been well documented. but the united states is now reaching out going to help israel in a new way. so that does strengthen bibi netanyahu's long-term position, as well. >> final question the other actor in the region we've been talking about all of them is egypt, of course. the u.s. has really fallen all over itself thanking egypt for its role in achieving a cease-fire here. but over the last 24 hours, something fascinating happened in egypt. the leader there mohamed morsi game himself immunity from any kind of legal challenge until there is a new constitution in that country. some people say that essentially lines him up to be a dictator. >> well he
are already being considered contenders for the most prestiges award, an oscar. >> reporter: the election isn't until february, but lincoln's candidacy is already getting a lot of support in the race for best picture. >> lincoln is sensational and steven spielburg in many years, it looks like that's going to be a major contender. >> reporter: deadline.com is tracking all the early oscar favorites. >> we're looking at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 pecking orders already. >> revolutionary going door to door. >> reporter: argo, i think, is really from the academy voters i've talked to loved that movie. >> also on the short list. >> life of pie, ang lee's movie. wonderful comedy drama. bradley cooper, jennifer, de niro, they could win. >> reporter: thinks oscar voters may double down on 007. >> now with sky fall, people are starting to talk about james bond being in the best picture race which i think is a good possibility of happening. >> reporter: if sky fall gets the best picture nod, it would be a first for the bond movie but the recognition may not end there. >> javier bardem is unbelievable in sky fall. al
to republicans. he will -- now he doesn't have to worry about getting re-elected. and he will kind of give up on the attempt to get bipartisan consensus, creating a new kind of post partisan washington. all of those dreams are gone by experience. and the lessons he has learned is to be a little bit tougher and that a result is more beneficial than a process that might look good, but that gets you no results. >> president obama, john, has said many times team of rooifb s -- rivals is one of his favorite books and if he had to save anything it would be the bible and the team of rivals. is he assembling a team of rivals during his second term? >> no, it doesn't appear to be the case. what's extraordinary about this film of lincoln and steward, that was his second rival, going after the 13th amendment is kind of the manager of the vote counting. lincoln puts this important task in the hands of his rival. there's no evidence that that is necessarily going to take place except for the fact that often in congressional negotiations the president, who doesn't have a great love of the working with sena
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